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A new Jewish synagogue, which became the biggest synagogue of Europe was opened in Baku on March 9, 2003.

There is also a Jewish school, which has been operating in Azerbaijan since 2003.

Currently, there are seven functioning synagogues in Azerbaijan: three in Baku, two in Quba and two in Oghuz.

In the early 1920s a few hundred Mountain Jewish families from Azerbaijan and Dagestan left for Israel and settled in Tel-Aviv.

The next aliyah did not take place until the 1970s, after the ban on Jewish immigration to Israel was lifted (see: Refusenik (Soviet Union)).

The theory of common origins of Tats and Mountain Jews (previously referred to as Judæo-Tats) has been vehemently dismissed by a number of researchers.

Mountain Jews currently dominate the entire Jewish Diaspora of Azerbaijan.

Today, Jews in Azerbaijan mainly consist of three distinct groups: Mountain Jews, the most sizable and most ancient group; Ashkenazi Jews, who settled in the area during the late 19th-early 20th centuries, and during World War II; and Georgian Jews who settled mainly in Baku during the early part of the 20th century.

Historically, Jews in Azerbaijan have been represented by various subgroups, mainly Mountain Jews, Ashkenazi Jews and Georgian Jews.

Besides ethnic Azerbaijanis, there were also Jews and Lezgis killed and buried during March Days in 1918.

After Sovietization all Zionism-related activities including those of cultural nature that were carried out in Hebrew were banned.

Ashkenazi Jews continued immigrating to Azerbaijan until the late 1940s, with a number of them being World War II evacuees from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus who chose to stay in their country of refuge.

Ashkenazi Jews were particularly active in Azerbaijani politics. Yevsey Gindes, a Kiev native, served as Minister of Health of the Democratic Republic of Azerbaijan (1918–1920).

1811 is the year when the first Ashkenazi Jews settled in Baku, but their mass immigration to what is now Azerbaijan did not start until the 1870s.

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