Dave schiess dating search

My experience is that most people have a natural intuition that every event can be traced back to a prior event that caused it.

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In that sense it might be more of a long-term competitor to the Amazon Echo (and whatever Android variant Google is pitching at the same space) than to Tesla’s cars. Three points for clarification: The old “What if they hired carpenters they way they hire programmers?

From this perspective, maybe the thing that’s kept the Apple TV on hold for so long is that they were trying to go down this road, but they kept failing to pull it off (to their standards) in the living room. ” joke/commentary didn’t sit right with me the first time I read it, and after stumbling across it again I now see why.

(Returning the first point, I suppose the implication is that driving a nail is the fizzbuzz of carpentry.) Let’s just cover the first few questions: If the only way you can describe your work is “I’m a programmer. Yes it would be friendlier if the interviewer led a bit with “What kind of work have you been doing? As an interviewer I’m open to the idea that someone good at any one of these probably has great potential for any of the others, but if you’ve got nothing more to say about your career than that you’ve done general things in a general sort of way, you can’t exactly blame me for taking my own direction on what details I’m going to dig into. And all those kinds of brown would seem to be of major interest to a carpenter: if something is being stained instead of painted then I’d think that would affect the choice of wood. If you’re building a software library that will be called by a UI, then responsiveness matters.

” or “Tell me about some of your favorite projects.” but you’ve got to meet a weak interviewer in the middle. If you’re writing an order processing system open to the public, then you need to consider denial-of-service issues.

The main premise of this complaint about programming interviews is that a programmer is a programmer is a programmer, and the details don’t matter, and that’s straight-up bullshit. If the overall software system will be distributed, then the architecture needs to take rollout into consideration.

Shrugging off context is only a professional qualification for field-goal kickers. I don’t think it’s used much (if at all) for stud wall construction, but it is occasionally used for post-and-beam construction, which involves either metal brackets or traditional cut joinery, and for nonstructural finishings.

There’s always a terrific slight of hand going on when software developers try to draw analogies to other fields.

Blue-collar credentials and being treated like a unique, creative, and highly-paid professional just aren’t compatible.

Pouting that interviews suck without suggesting any improvements is just childish, and doubly so if you’re complaining not about the bizarre “puzzle question” or “culture fit” interviews, but about being questioned on knowledge and experience.

Technical interviews can be annoying and they can be done badly, but I’d still much rather work in an industry that does tech interviews than one forced to rely solely on CV reviews and personality-driven poking at “soft skills”.

The exceptions—coders who really want nothing more than to follow some formula and take no responsibility for the result—are exactly who interviewers are trying to weed out.

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