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The most infamous line was Shaggy’s “F***in’ magnets how do they work?” but the remainder of the verse, which insisted “I don’t wanna talk to a scientist,” raised the ire of many media types, who jumped into the fray on the side of science.

That changed with “Miracles.” A song that went viral online last year after the band augmented it with a video, “Miracles” was ICP’s most overt admission of the belief in God they’d first revealed almost a decade earlier.

It also stirred up a fresh wave of controversy by suggesting that everyday events like fog and rainbows shouldn’t be taken for granted.

Not that they are, actually, evangelical Christians. Neither attends church or claims any biblical knowledge. After all, this is a group which has always chosen to illustrate the dark side of human nature in the most graphic terms possible.

In fact, neither man can even pronounce “evangelical.”“We’re not envelichiculous … From ICP’s early days, when the group aroused the wrath of the Disney company through tracks like “The Neden Game” (a super X-rated “Dating Game” parody) and “Boogie Woogie Wu” (which imagined the boogie man in particularly horrific form), Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope have courted controversy on a consistent basis. ” — included “To Catch A Predator,” which vividly imagined entrapping and torturing a sex offender.

It’s that last view that has put ICP back in the critics’ crosshairs, following the release of a song, “Miracles,” that dares to suggest science might not have all the answers.“Number one, I don’t know what an inveligecal (sic) Christian is.

I don’t even know what an inveligecal is,” declares Violent J, during a break in recording sessions for ICP’s next album.

How about calling them Christians — evangelical Christians, at that.

That’s the unfamiliar position in which Detroit rappers Violent J (Joseph Bruce) and Shaggy 2 Dope (Joseph Utsler) find themselves, following one of the strangest years of their long, strange, 20-year trip through the music industry. ”Of course, casual followers of the group’s frequent headline-making outrages would never have mistaken Insane Clown Posse for pious Christians.

“But number two, I think it’s sad that in today’s world, all you gotta do is say you believe in God, and people freak out on that. “At the end of the day,” he explains, “I was always taught by my mom, that the good people go to heaven, and the bad people go to hell.”That heaven-or-hell choice has run through ICP’s mythology for years, via its Dark Carnival and Joker’s Cards, which offer the band’s own conception of the afterlife.

“There’s an all-around message to the Dark Carnival (and) the Joker’s Cards,” says Violent J.

Although they were dumped by the Disney company, they went on to mainstream success.

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