A sedating

More severe, life-threatening allergy symptoms include swelling of the throat, wheezing and difficulty breathing.

Nasal corticosteroids can cause nasal dryness or irritation, nosebleed, throat irritation, headache, nausea, vomiting, cough, and fungal infections of the throat with long-term use.

Mast cell stabilizers can cause a short-lived stinging sensation inside the nose.

Newer antihistamines are said to be non-sedating, although some users may experience drowsiness even from these.

All antihistamines work in the same way: by competing with histamine to prevent or reduce the characteristic signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction: swelling, tearing, itching, and increase in bronchial and other secretions.

Drugs affecting metabolism of corticosteroids, such as ketoconazole (Nizoral, Xolegel, Extina, Ketoconazole Cream) and ritonavir (Kaletra Capsules, Kaletra Tablets, Norvir).

Drugs that stimulate liver metabolism, such as phenytoin (Dilantin,) phenobarbital, and carbamazepine (Tegretol) – as well as the antibiotic Rifampin.

Allergies occur when the body's immune system responds to a substance it considers an "invader." Substances that provoke the immune system into an allergic response are known as allergens. What might trigger a life-threatening allergic response in one person might cause absolutely no harm in another.

The physiological mechanism of allergic reactions is the same, however, in everyone.

They are often used if other agents are ineffective or intolerable.

Autoinjectable epinephrine: This is used to treat a life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis, which may be caused by severe allergic response to foods, drugs, or insect stings.

Antihistamines (sedating) Older antihistamines are associated with drowsiness, dizziness, constipation, upset stomach, blurry vision, a dry mouth/nose and throat, and difficulty urinating.

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